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25 Publications visible to you, out of a total of 25

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is a last-resort treatment to induce substantial and sustained weight loss in cases of severe obesity. This anatomical rearrangement affects the intestinal microbiota, but so far, little information is available on how it interferes with microbial functionality and microbial-host interactions independently of weight loss. METHODS: A rat model was employed where the RYGB-surgery cohort is compared to sham-operated controls which were kept at a matched body weight by food restriction. We investigated the microbial taxonomy and functional activity using 16S rRNA amplicon gene sequencing, metaproteomics, and metabolomics on samples collected from theileum, the cecum, and the colon, and separately analysed the lumen and mucus-associated microbiota. RESULTS: Altered gut architecture in RYGB increased the relative occurrence of Actinobacteria, especially Bifidobacteriaceae and Proteobacteria, while in general, Firmicutes were decreased although Streptococcaceae and Clostridium perfringens were observed at relative higher abundances independent of weight loss. A decrease of conjugated and secondary bile acids was observed in the RYGB-gut lumen. The arginine biosynthesis pathway in the microbiota was altered, as indicated by the changes in the abundance of upstream metabolites and enzymes, resulting in lower levels of arginine and higher levels of aspartate in the colon after RYGB. CONCLUSION: The anatomical rearrangement in RYGB affects microbiota composition and functionality as well as changes in amino acid and bile acid metabolism independently of weight loss. The shift in the taxonomic structure of the microbiota after RYGB may be mediated by the resulting change in the composition of the bile acid pool in the gut and by changes in the composition of nutrients in the gut. Video abstract.

Authors: S. B. Haange, N. Jehmlich, U. Krugel, C. Hintschich, D. Wehrmann, M. Hankir, F. Seyfried, J. Froment, T. Hubschmann, S. Muller, D. K. Wissenbach, K. Kang, C. Buettner, G. Panagiotou, M. Noll, U. Rolle-Kampczyk, W. Fenske, M. von Bergen

Date Published: 7th Feb 2020

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Exercise is an effective strategy for diabetes management but is limited by the phenomenon of exercise resistance (i.e., the lack of or the adverse response to exercise on metabolic health). Here, in 39 medication-naive men with prediabetes, we found that exercise-induced alterations in the gut microbiota correlated closely with improvements in glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity (clinicaltrials.gov entry NCT03240978). The microbiome of responders exhibited an enhanced capacity for biosynthesis of short-chain fatty acids and catabolism of branched-chain amino acids, whereas those of non-responders were characterized by increased production of metabolically detrimental compounds. Fecal microbial transplantation from responders, but not non-responders, mimicked the effects of exercise on alleviation of insulin resistance in obese mice. Furthermore, a machine-learning algorithm integrating baseline microbial signatures accurately predicted personalized glycemic response to exercise in an additional 30 subjects. These findings raise the possibility of maximizing the benefits of exercise by targeting the gut microbiota.

Authors: Y. Liu, Y. Wang, Y. Ni, C. K. Y. Cheung, K. S. L. Lam, Y. Wang, Z. Xia, D. Ye, J. Guo, M. A. Tse, G. Panagiotou, A. Xu

Date Published: 7th Jan 2020

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

Despite the documented antibiotic-induced disruption of the gut microbiota, the impact of antibiotic intake on strain-level dynamics, evolution of resistance genes, and factors influencing resistance dissemination potential remains poorly understood. To address this gap we analyzed public metagenomic datasets from 24 antibiotic treated subjects and controls, combined with an in-depth prospective functional study with two subjects investigating the bacterial community dynamics based on cultivation-dependent and independent methods. We observed that short-term antibiotic treatment shifted and diversified the resistome composition, increased the average copy number of antibiotic resistance genes, and altered the dominant strain genotypes in an individual-specific manner. More than 30% of the resistance genes underwent strong differentiation at the single nucleotide level during antibiotic treatment. We found that the increased potential for horizontal gene transfer, due to antibiotic administration, was approximately 3-fold stronger in the differentiated resistance genes than the non-differentiated ones. This study highlights how antibiotic treatment has individualized impacts on the resistome and strain level composition, and drives the adaptive evolution of the gut microbiota.

Authors: J. Li, E. A. Rettedal, E. van der Helm, M. Ellabaan, G. Panagiotou, M. O. A. Sommer

Date Published: 27th Apr 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: The selection of bioengineering platform strains and engineering strategies to improve the stress resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae remains a pressing need in bio-based chemical production. Thus, a systematic effort to exploit genotypic and phenotypic diversity to boost yeast's industrial value is still urgently needed. RESULTS: We analyzed 5,400 growth curves obtained from 36 S. cerevisiae strains and comprehensively profiled their resistances against 13 industrially relevant stresses. We observed that bioethanol and brewing strains exhibit higher resistance against acidic conditions; however, plant isolates tend to have a wider range of resistance, which may be associated with their metabolome and fluxome signatures in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid metabolism. By deep genomic sequencing, we found that industrial strains have more genomic duplications especially affecting transcription factors, showing that they result from disparate evolutionary paths in comparison with the environmental strains, which have more indels, gene deletions, and strain-specific genes. Genome-wide association studies coupled with protein-protein interaction networks uncovered novel genetic determinants of stress resistances. CONCLUSIONS: These resistance-related engineering targets and strain rankings provide a valuable source for engineering significantly improved industrial platform strains.

Authors: K. Kang, B. Bergdahl, D. Machado, L. Dato, T. L. Han, J. Li, S. Villas-Boas, M. J. Herrgard, J. Forster, G. Panagiotou

Date Published: 1st Apr 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: Viruses are important components of microbial communities modulating community structure and function; however, only a couple of tools are currently available for phage identification and analysis from metagenomic sequencing data. Here we employed the random forest algorithm to develop VirMiner, a web-based phage contig prediction tool especially sensitive for high-abundances phage contigs, trained and validated by paired metagenomic and phagenomic sequencing data from the human gut flora. RESULTS: VirMiner achieved 41.06% +/- 17.51% sensitivity and 81.91% +/- 4.04% specificity in the prediction of phage contigs. In particular, for the high-abundance phage contigs, VirMiner outperformed other tools (VirFinder and VirSorter) with much higher sensitivity (65.23% +/- 16.94%) than VirFinder (34.63% +/- 17.96%) and VirSorter (18.75% +/- 15.23%) at almost the same specificity. Moreover, VirMiner provides the most comprehensive phage analysis pipeline which is comprised of metagenomic raw reads processing, functional annotation, phage contig identification, and phage-host relationship prediction (CRISPR-spacer recognition) and supports two-group comparison when the input (metagenomic sequence data) includes different conditions (e.g., case and control). Application of VirMiner to an independent cohort of human gut metagenomes obtained from individuals treated with antibiotics revealed that 122 KEGG orthology and 118 Pfam groups had significantly differential abundance in the pre-treatment samples compared to samples at the end of antibiotic administration, including clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), multidrug resistance, and protein transport. The VirMiner webserver is available at http://sbb.hku.hk/VirMiner/ . CONCLUSIONS: We developed a comprehensive tool for phage prediction and analysis for metagenomic samples. Compared to VirSorter and VirFinder-the most widely used tools-VirMiner is able to capture more high-abundance phage contigs which could play key roles in infecting bacteria and modulating microbial community dynamics. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The European Union Clinical Trials Register, EudraCT Number: 2013-003378-28 . Registered on 9 April 2014.

Authors: T. Zheng, J. Li, Y. Ni, K. Kang, M. A. Misiakou, L. Imamovic, B. K. C. Chow, A. A. Rode, P. Bytzer, M. Sommer, G. Panagiotou

Date Published: 19th Mar 2019

Publication Type: Not specified

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