Publications

Abstract (Expand)

Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans. It exists as a commensal in the oral cavity, gut or genital tract of most individuals, constrained by the local microbiota, epithelial barriers and immune defences. Their perturbation can lead to fungal outgrowth and the development of mucosal infections such as oropharyngeal or vulvovaginal candidiasis, and patients with compromised immunity are susceptible to life-threatening systemic infections. The importance of the interplay between fungus, host and microbiota in driving the transition from C. albicans commensalism to pathogenicity is widely appreciated. However, the complexity of these interactions, and the significant impact of fungal, host and microbiota variability upon disease severity and outcome, are less well understood. Therefore, we summarise the features of the fungus that promote infection, and how genetic variation between clinical isolates influences pathogenicity. We discuss antifungal immunity, how this differs between mucosae, and how individual variation influences a person's susceptibility to infection. Also, we describe factors that influence the composition of gut, oral and vaginal microbiotas, and how these affect fungal colonisation and antifungal immunity. We argue that a detailed understanding of these variables, which underlie fungal-host-microbiota interactions, will present opportunities for directed antifungal therapies that benefit vulnerable patients.

Authors: C. d'Enfert, A. K. Kaune, L. R. Alaban, S. Chakraborty, N. Cole, M. Delavy, D. Kosmala, B. Marsaux, R. Frois-Martins, M. Morelli, D. Rosati, M. Valentine, Z. Xie, Y. Emritloll, P. A. Warn, F. Bequet, M. E. Bougnoux, S. Bornes, Mark Gresnigt, Bernhard Hube, Ilse Jacobsen, M. Legrand, S. Leibundgut-Landmann, C. Manichanh, C. A. Munro, M. G. Netea, K. Queiroz, K. Roget, V. Thomas, C. Thoral, P. Van den Abbeele, A. W. Walker, A. J. P. Brown

Date Published: 24th Nov 2020

Journal: FEMS Microbiol Rev

Abstract (Expand)

The fungal pathogen Candida albicans forms polymorphic biofilms where hyphal morphogenesis and metabolic adaptation are tightly coordinated by a complex intertwined network of transcription factors. The sensing and metabolism of amino acids play important roles during various phases of biofilm development - from adhesion to maturation. Stp2 is a transcription factor that activates the expression of amino acid permease genes and is required for environmental alkalinization and hyphal growth in vitro and during macrophage phagocytosis. While it is well established that Stp2 is activated in response to external amino acids, its role in biofilm formation remains unknown. In addition to widely used techniques, we applied newly developed approaches for automated image analysis to quantify Stp2-regulated filamentation and biofilm growth. Our results show that in the stp2Delta deletion mutant adherence to abiotic surfaces and initial germ tube formation were strongly impaired, but formed mature biofilms with cell density and morphological structures comparable to the control strains. Stp2-dependent nutrient adaptation appeared to play an important role in biofilm development: stp2Delta biofilms formed under continuous nutrient flow displayed an overall reduction in biofilm formation, whereas under steady conditions the mutant strain formed biofilms with lower metabolic activity, resulting in increased cell survival and biofilm longevity. A deletion of STP2 led to increased rapamycin susceptibility and transcriptional activation of GCN4, the transcriptional regulator of the general amino acid control pathway, demonstrating a connection of Stp2 to other nutrient-responsive pathways. In summary, the transcription factor Stp2 is important for C. albicans biofilm formation, where it contributes to adherence and induction of morphogenesis, and mediates nutrient adaption and cell longevity in mature biofilms.

Authors: B. Bottcher, B. Hoffmann, E. Garbe, T. Weise, Z. Cseresnyes, Philipp Brandt, Stefanie Dietrich, D. Driesch, Marc Thilo Figge, Slavena Vylkova

Date Published: 20th May 2020

Journal: Front Microbiol

Abstract (Expand)

Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1alpha]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. IMPORTANCE: Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule which controls morphological plasticity of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. As such, it is a major mediator of intraspecies communication. Here, we investigated the impact of farnesol on human innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. We show that farnesol is able to enhance inflammation by inducing activation of neutrophils and monocytes. At the same time, farnesol impairs differentiation of monocytes into immature dendritic cells (iDC) by modulating surface phenotype, cytokine release and migrational behavior. Consequently, iDC generated in the presence of farnesol are unable to induce proper T cell responses and fail to secrete Th1 promoting interleukin 12 (IL-12). As farnesol induced down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor, desensitization to GM-CSF could potentially explain transcriptional reprofiling of iDC effector molecules. Taken together, our data show that farnesol can also mediate Candida-host communication and is able to act as a virulence factor.

Authors: I. Leonhardt, S. Spielberg, M. Weber, D. Albrecht-Eckardt, M. Blass, R. Claus, D. Barz, K. Scherlach, C. Hertweck, J. Loffler, Kerstin Hünniger, Oliver Kurzai

Date Published: 19th Mar 2015

Journal: MBio

Abstract (Expand)

Candida albicans is the most important fungal pathogen of humans, causing severe infections, especially in nosocomial and immunocompromised settings. However, it is also the most prevalent fungus of the normal human microbiome, where it shares its habitat with hundreds of trillions of other microbial cells. Despite weak organic acids (WOAs) being among the most abundant metabolites produced by bacterial microbiota, little is known about their effect on C. albicans. Here we used a sequencing-based profiling strategy to systematically investigate the transcriptional stress response of C. albicans to lactic, acetic, propionic, and butyric acid at several time points after treatment. Our data reveal a complex transcriptional response, with individual WOAs triggering unique gene expression profiles and with important differences between acute and chronic exposure. Despite these dissimilarities, we found significant overlaps between the gene expression changes induced by each WOA, which led us to uncover a core transcriptional response that was largely unrelated to other previously published C. albicans transcriptional stress responses. Genes commonly up-regulated by WOAs were enriched in several iron transporters, which was associated with an overall decrease in intracellular iron concentrations. Moreover, chronic exposure to any WOA lead to down-regulation of RNA synthesis and ribosome biogenesis genes, which resulted in significant reduction of total RNA levels and of ribosomal RNA in particular. In conclusion, this study suggests that gastrointestinal microbiota might directly influence C. albicans physiology via production of WOAs, with possible implications of how this fungus interacts with its host in both health and disease.

Authors: F. Cottier, A. S. Tan, J. Chen, J. Lum, F. Zolezzi, M. Poidinger, N. Pavelka

Date Published: 1st Feb 2015

Journal: G3 (Bethesda)

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